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BrickStove with container: Forced ventilation of wood stoves
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Forced ventilation of wood stoves

Imagine having no chimney. That should not be the end of using a wood burning stove. We are experimenting with a wood stove build from bricks and concrete tiles. Have a look at our website and you'll find some news on latest progress in its construction. As the stove did not function with a bad, thin, croocked chimney pipe, we decided to install a ventilator. Then this stove burned niceley!
Now this is what we are heading for and we ask your comment and very specially your knowledge about prior experience with a similar setup:

  1. Air intake and outlet close together in a wall to prevent differences in pressure because of wind.
  2. Forcing the draft through the stove with the smallest ventilator possible. A bit similar to the high-efficency gas powered central heating units.
  3. We fuel the stove by a container, from which the wood sacks into the fire. As this happens at a slow continues pace, we should provide for an adequate quantity of air. is there a rule of thumb how much more air should be sucked in than is actually used to burn the fuel? This for preventing tar build up in the system.
  4. We play with the idea to drive the ventilator with a primitive Stirling engine. It may be a very simpified system, as there is plenty heat available in relation to the little power needed to force the draft.
  5. Smoke jetted from the outlet should of course not pollute the environment. Smoke from a well designed heat box burning at 1200 C would not contain much polluting parts, however it is feasable to 'wash' the smoke when the force of the ventilator is available for such a process.
  6. Who is doing experiments with alternatives for chimneys? We like to share our experience with such people through the "Open Sourc" principle, as described in our website Looking forward to productive comments!

    BrickStove with container: Forced ventilation of wood stoves
    1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next >